Solo Booth/Richard Taittinger Gallery at 1-54 Art Fair
May
5
to May 8

Solo Booth/Richard Taittinger Gallery at 1-54 Art Fair

 

1:54 Contemporary African Art Fair

BOOTH B-09


Pioneer Works. 159 Pioneer Street, Brooklyn NY 11231

Richard Taittinger Gallery is proud to present a solo booth of new works by South African artist Frances Goodman at the 1:54 Contemporary African Art Fair. VIP opening reception on Thursday May 5th. 

Working with objects commonly associated with female identity, such as acrylic nails, false eyelashes, and jewelry, Goodman explores how beauty regimes and perfectionism creates obsession and neuroses. Her humorously dark sculptures and installations suggest how self-conscious anxieties play a disproportionate role in governing women’s lives. In her examination of beauty conventions, marriage traditions, and common material possessions, Goodman reveals both the self-imposed and external pressures to conform to societal expectation. Her works rebel against the influence of the male gaze and a media-obsessed, mainstream culture. Meanwhile their glossy, sensual surfaces capture the underlying libidinal energy that motivates consumption, from a gleaming car hood to a metallic nail polish sheen. Her work is included in several major international collections, including Sindika Dokolo Collection, Angola; Smithsonian Institution, USA; 21c Museum, USA; Francis J. Greenburger Collection, USA;  UNISA, South Africa.

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Rapaciously Yours,
Feb
26
to Apr 16

Rapaciously Yours,

  • Richard Taittinger Gallery (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Richard Taittinger Gallery is honored to present Rapaciously Yours, the first major solo exhibition of works by South African artist Frances Goodman in the United States.

“Rapacious” is defined as inordinately greedy, ravenous, and predatory. For Goodman, the term represents attributes that are only criticized in women, not men. With the spite of a sarcastic closing greeting, Rapaciously Yours investigates the complexities within the feminist pursuit of feeling at once powerful, self-satisfied, and desirable. In creating sculptural works with acrylic nails, Goodman defies the presumed superficiality of objects commonly associated with female identity. Works such as Violaceous (2015), made from an accumulation of false nails, evoke anatomical growths or scaled creatures. Their simultaneously alluring and unsettling qualities assert how self-ornamentation can act as a mode of empowerment.

Goodman’s enlarged talon-shaped nail sculptures, titled and patterned with designs from fake nail catalogues, further encapsulate their protective, totemic properties. Goodman also employs text to capture voices frequently subdued into silence. Car seats feature accounts from women, mostly sex workers, speaking about their loss of innocence and gaining of sexual power through experience. Feminine items that are often lost – pearls, necklaces, and earrings – transcribe their feelings of secret satisfaction, disappointment, or resignation.

Meanwhile, the immersive installation The Dream (2010-2016) is a seminal work that explores the social expectation of women to marry. Constructed from dozens of once-worn wedding dresses, organza, satin, and tulle, the work includes audio recordings from interviews with women divulging anxieties about how their true desires compare with the norm.

From prostitute to bride, Rapaciously Yours highlights the lack of socially acceptable ways for women to honor their innermost desires and ambitions. In her examination of beauty conventions, marriage traditions, and common material possessions, Goodman articulates both the self-imposed and external pressures for women to conform.

On view through April 16

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Richard Taittinger Gallery Represents Frances Goodman
Dec
4
to Feb 1

Richard Taittinger Gallery Represents Frances Goodman

Richard Taittinger Gallery is pleased to announce the representation of South African artist Frances Goodman (b. 1975). 

The gallery will present a solo exhibition with new works by Frances Goodman during 2016 Armory Week.

Frances Goodman is a multimedia artist born in Johannesburg, South Africa. Working with objects commonly associated with female identity, such as acrylic nails, false eyelashes, and jewelry, Goodman explores how their habitual usage evolves into obsession and neuroses. Her humorously dark sculptures and installations suggest self-conscious anxieties play a disproportionate role in governing women’s lives. In her examination of beauty conventions, marriage traditions, and common material possessions, Goodman reveals both the self-imposed and external pressures to conform to societal expectation. Her works rebel against the influence of the male gaze and a media-obsessed, mainstream culture. Meanwhile their glossy, sensual surfaces capture the underlying libidinal energy that motivates consumption, from a gleaming car hood to a metallic nail polish sheen.

Visit the artist page

"Though Goodman's work reflects a society in which objects can define and burden people; it also celebrates the use of these materials as symbols of empowerment."

— Jennie Lamesdorf

Curator of Francis J. Greenburger Collection

Director and Curator of Art-in-Buildings

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Lick It
Dec
1
to Feb 7

Lick It

 

LICK IT | FRANCES GOODMAN

Windows@Walgreens | 6700 Collins Ave, Miami Beach, FL 33141

The mediums used in Frances Goodman's work are the materials and labor of the beauty industry. Goodman deftly deploys fake nails, false eyelashes, earrings, pearls, and sequins, among many other items found in the beauty aisle, to create works that are simultaneously seductive and appalling.  The repetitive and meticulous gestures used to create Lick It mimic the repetitive and meticulous labors of nail salons and beauty maintenance regimes. By employing these materials and efforts, Goodman’s work draws attention to popular assumptions that narrow the possibilities of female identity to extremes of consumption, aspiration, obsession, desire, and anxiety. Though Goodman’s work references a society in which objects can define and burden people, it also celebrates the use of these materials as symbols of empowerment.  - Jennie Lamensdorf, Art in Buildings

Lick It was created during Goodman's residency at Fountainhead Residency in Miami.

Presented by ArtCenter/South Florida

http://www.artcentersf.org/lick-it/

Lick It

Lick It

Photo by Silvia Ros

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Lush
Nov
27
to Jan 22

Lush

SMAC Gallery is pleased to announce the opening of:

LUSH

LUSH presents works by six artists of diverse backgrounds and practices, each exploring in disparate ways themes of excess, contemporary culture, historical and personal narratives, female identity, representation and eco-feminism.

FEATURED ARTISTS

Frances Goodman

Alexandra Karakashian

Chemu Ng’ok

Marlene Steyn

Shoshanna Weinberger

Barbara Wildenboer

 

 

STELLENBOSCH

1st Floor, De Wet Centre

Church Street

Stellenbosch, 7600

T: +27 (0)21 887 3607

F: +27 (0)21 887 7624

 

info@smacgallery.com

www.smacgallery.com

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Let Down Your Hair
Nov
11
to Feb 1

Let Down Your Hair

Let Down Your Hair is a site-responsive sculptural installation composed of densely wrapped cascading elements that resemble brightly colored ropes woven into a protective nest. Tendrils extend from the core and across the curved wall of the 55 5th Avenue lobby, exploring the limits of the architecture. As with much of Goodman’s work, Let Down Your Hair is deceiving: the slick, shiny surfaces, bright colors, and elegant lines resemble, at first glance, a formal study in gesture and materials. Upon closer inspection, however, the work reveals itself to be constructed of thousands of individual acrylic nails.

The mediums used in Frances Goodman's practice are the materials and labor of the beauty industry. Goodman deftly deploys fake nails, false eyelashes, earrings, pearls, and sequins, among many other items found in the beauty aisle, to create works that are simultaneously seductive and appalling. The repetitive and meticulous gestures used to create Let Down Your Hair mimic the repetitive and meticulous labors of nail salons and beauty maintenance regimes. By employing these materials and efforts, Goodman’s work draws attention to popular assumptions that narrow the possibilities of female identity to extremes of consumption, aspiration, obsession, desire, and anxiety.

The beauty industry hinges on implicit and explicit messages that personal betterment can be found in a product. Loyalty to this system can amount to extreme investments of time and money, leaving devotees little opportunity to consider themselves under a structure of control. Though Goodman’s work references a society in which objects can define and burden people, it also celebrates the use of these materials as symbols of empowerment. The very existence of the pre-fabricated Big Bird-yellow, zinc white, and electric blue talons that Goodman employs in Let Down Your Hair is evidence of women embracing their own version of beautiful, rather than what mainstream culture mandates.

Born in 1975 in Johannesburg South Africa, Goodman is fast becoming known as one of South Africa’s strongest artistic voices of feminism and consumerism. Goodman studied Fine Arts at Wits University, Johannesburg. On completion of an MA at Goldsmiths College, London, UK, she lived in Antwerp, Belgium, where she was artist in residence at HISK (Higher Institute for Fine Arts). Goodman has had solo exhibitions at the Goodman Gallery in South Africa, Aeroplastics in Belgium, (Art)Amalgamated in New York and TM Projects in Geneva. She has participated in major international exhibitions such as The Divine Comedy: Heaven, Hell, Purgatory revisited by Contemporary African Artists commencing at MMK Frankfurt and travelling to the Smithsonian and SCAD, Savannah, Lust and Vice: From Durer to Nauman at the Kunstmuseum Bern, Spheres, at Le Moulin, France and Beauty and Pleasure, The Stenersen Museum, Oslo, Norway. Her work has been shown at the Armory, ArtBasel and ArtBasel Miami. She has been invited onto a number of residencies, including Art Omi, New York, ISCP, New York, The Foundation GegenwART Berne, Switzerland, Recollets International Accommodation and Exchange Centre, Paris and, Artist’s Work Program, Irish Museum of Modern Art Dublin, Ireland. 

For press inquiries please contact: Nikki Buccina, QUINN | nbuccina@quinn.pr | 212.868.1900 x387

Let Down Your Hair is curated by Jennie Lamensdorf and sponsored by the Time Equities Inc. (TEI) Art-in-Buildings. TEI is committed to enriching the experience of our properties through the Art-in-Buildings Program, an innovative approach that brings contemporary art by emerging and mid-career artists to non-traditional exhibition spaces in the interest of promoting artists, expanding the audience for art, and creating a more interesting environment for our building occupants, residents, and their guests.

 

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Oct
27
9:30 AM09:30

Art Table Discussion

 

The ArtTable FL Chapter announces the next installment of The Breakfast Club generously hosted by the renowned Fountainhead Residency.  The artist residency was founded by collectors Dan and Kathryn Mikesell in early 2008, to introduce visiting artists to Miami’s art community and it’s many supporters, and to infuse Miami with artistic inspiration from around the world.  At The Fountainhead Residency artists have the opportunity to become truly integrated into Miami’s vibrant, close-knit, and very supportive art community, and are given an opportunity to meet and receive feedback from respected curators, collectors, gallerists and other artists.

 

We are very pleased present an exciting conversation led by Kathryn Mikesell with the residency’s two current artists:  

 

Frances Goodman:  The artist’s work draws attention to popular culture definitions that narrow the possibilities of female identity to extremes of consumption, aspiration, obsession, desire and anxiety. 

Born in 1975 in Johannesburg South Africa, she studied Fine Arts at Wits University, Johannesburg. On completion of an MA at Goldsmiths College, London, UK, she began her career in Antwerp, Belgium.  She has participated in major international exhibitions such as The Divine Comedy: Heaven, Hell, Purgatory revisited by Contemporary African Artists commencing at MMK Frankfurt and travelling to the Smithsonian and SCAD, Savannah, Lust and Vice: From Durer to Nauman at the Kunstmuseum Bern, Spheres, at Le Moulin, France and Beauty and Pleasure, The Stenersen Museum, Oslo, Norway. Her work has been shown at the Armory, ArtBasel and ArtBasel Miami.  For more on Frances Goodman please visit:
http://www.francesgoodman.com/

 

Trish Tillman:  Tillman’s work pulls together a myriad of foreign objects and materials in order to construct private memorials, characters, and monuments to domestic and social rituals and cultural idiosyncrasy.

 

Trish Tillman is a visual artist who grew up in Washington, DC and now lives in New York City. She received a Bachelor of Fine Arts from James Madison University in Virginia, and studied at the University of Wolverhampton in the UK before pursuing her Master of Fine Arts from School of Visual Arts in New York. She is a recipient of the Joan Mitchell Foundation 2009 MFA Grant and has received grants through the D.C. Commission on the Arts and Humanities as well as the Baltimore Office of Promotions and the Arts.  She has most recently exhibited her work with Regina Rex, NYC; Emerson Dorsch Gallery, Miami, FL; Elephant Art Space, Los Angeles, CA; Present Company, NYC; Slag Gallery, NYC; Nudashank, Baltimore, MD; and Civilian Art Projects, Washington, DC. For more on Trish Tillman please visit: http://www.trishtillman.com/

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The 'F' Word: Feminism in Art
Oct
20
to Oct 28

The 'F' Word: Feminism in Art

 

A Group Show of 20 Female Contemporary Artists
Curated by Indira Cesarine & Denise Krimershmoys

OPENING RECEPTION
Tuesday, October 20th
6-9pm
The Untitled Space
45 Lispenard Street Unit 1W

Featuring a Special Performance by Art Collective Legacy Fatale

Exhibition on View
October 21 – 28 | 10am – 5pm

The Untitled Magazine is pleased to present: “The ‘F’ Word: Feminism in Art” A group show of 20 female contemporary artists at The Untitled Space in New York City from October 20 – 28th, 2015. Curated by gallery director Indira Cesarine and Denise Krimershmoys of Vohn Gallery, the exhibit features a wide array of mediums, including painting, sculpture, photography, printmaking, and embroidery. Each artist individually addresses concepts revolving around feminism with works that either challenge gender stereotypes or embrace female empowerment, with literal or metaphorical visual language. Featured artists include: Annika ConnorAnya RubinChristina KruseCoco DolleCocoRosieElektra KBEllen JongFrances GoodmanHye Rim LeeIndira CesarineJennifer Caviola aka CakeJessica LichtensteinLangdon GravesMari KimNatalie WhiteRobyn HastySophia WallaceTatyana MurrayVexta, and Zana Briski.

The opening will feature a special performance by Legacy Fatale, an interdisciplinary performance art collective born in New York under the direction of artist Coco Dolle and co-leader Shawn Bishop. Its concept is based on recent archeological discoveries of the ancient nomadic Amazons, warrior women. Incorporating original music composition and costumes, Legacy Fatales performances are evocative of tribal and pagan rituals, ceremonial processions and interpretative dances.  Legacy Fatale represents a hybrid breed of mythical and contemporary female archetypes, honoring a global buried matriarchal lineage. The collective has previously performed at numerous art fairs and venues including Miami Art Basel, Select Art Fair, Fountain Art Fair, Sensei Gallery, and Lincoln Center.

The exhibition “The ‘F’ Word: Feminism in Art” was curated in celebration of The #GirlPower Issue of The Untitled Magazine, and is part of the publication’s “Women in Art” series, which features a wide range of contemporary female artists in a series of solo exhibitions and group shows at The Untitled Space on an ongoing basis.

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Sep
15
to Oct 31

Residency at the Fountainhead Residency

 

The Fountainhead Residency was founded by collectors Dan and Kathryn Mikesell in early 2008.  Later in 2008 they opened The Fountainhead Studios, which now provides over 30 Miami-based artists with affordable, flexible studio space.  From 2012-2014, they opened The Fountainhead Haus, which provided 5 Miami based artists unique working and collaborative space.

The Fountainhead Residency was founded with five goals: to provide artists an opportunity to find new inspiration (a fountainhead), to introduce visiting artists to Miami’s art community and it’s many supporters, to infuse Miami with artistic inspiration from around the world, enable our art institutions to realize more ambitious shows, and finally to provide our family an opportunity to become more intimately integrated in the world of artists and art.   

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Winter Sculpture Fair at Nirox
May
18
to Jul 15

Winter Sculpture Fair at Nirox

The Nirox sculpture | WINTER 2015 exhibition has 36 artists and 68 works on exhibition. These include a majority of outdoor pieces in the landscape with a selection of smaller indoor maquettes and works. The exhibition is by appointment or prior arrangement during the week, and open every weekend Saturday and Sunday 10am – 4pm.

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Money Makes the World Go Round
May
18
to Jun 12

Money Makes the World Go Round

MONEY, MONEY, MONEY ..... The exhibition Money Makes the World Go Round is all about money! Money, which is an omnipresent part of our lives and affects almost every aspect of our existence. Central to the works presented is the money which flows through society and its structures of power, and thus our relationship to money politically, socially and morally.


Carlos Aires (ES, 1974) uses the banknotes of the 30 richest nations in terms of GDP. In the work "Money Makes the World Go Round", he cut silhouettes out in banknotes, silhouettes which represent some form of power that money can provide. In other works, he juxtaposes a banknote with a picture of an event that has taken place in the country where the note came from. Aires' works point out the power structures and the relation between the state and the individual.

Lars Arrhenius (SE, 1966) has depicted the flow of a banknote from coming out of an ATM machine till it ends up in the bank again in his large work “Domino”. The banknote flows through all layers of society, and is used for both innocent as well as more shady purposes.

Frances Goodman (ZA, 1976) shows a new series of bank notes woven in beads. In earlier times, the beads functioned as a currency and woven pearls were in several cultures an expression of status and high culture. In Goodman's works one could say that the old and the new currency meet in one. In a series of new eyelash drawings Goodman makes notes on money as an ultimate symbol of power.

Andreas Schulenburg (DE / DK, 1975) has made enlarged dollar bills in felt. He has meticulously felted the banknotes, and he has replaced President portraits with images of the losers in the American society

 

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